So you want to do a pullup? Here’s how.

To me, pullups are one of the best exercises for developing back size and strength.  They are a staple in our programming for both kids and adults.  But what if someone can’t do them?  Does that mean they are doomed to be small and weak?  Absolutely not! Here’s the progressions we use to get people better and pulllups:

1.  Lose weight – Very rarely will you ever see a male over 20% bodyfat or a female over 25% be able to do a pullup.  Having extra fat just means you’re having to move excess weight.

2.  Banded chinups (supinated grip)/Banded pullups (pronated grip) – For this one, we place a band around the J-Hooks of the squat rack and stand on it while pulling up to the bar.  I do this, instead of looping it around the chinup bar because it is easier to adjust the height of the band.  It prevents the athlete’s shoe from getting caught in the band while exiting the rack.  It’s really important in all of these exercises to squeeze the shoulder blades together in the back.  It shouldn’t look like you’re doing a crunch at the top.

On Bad Training Days

 

missed lift

They can’t all be gems.” – Dan John

It’s bound to happen even with the best training and recovery program out there. You’ll have a really bad day at the gym. The kind of day that makes you wonder why you even train at all. The kind of day that makes you consider giving it all up for your couch and a box of Oreos. Even if these thoughts are fleeting, a bad training session can shake your confidence in your lifting ability and in your training program.

I’ve had workouts when nothing feels right; The days when I feel like a baby giraffe under the bar, like I’ve never touched 100 pounds before, let alone get it over my head. Where weights the previous day flew up effortlessly while today I’m struggling to grind out just one more. Where my technique is so off that as soon as I fix one problem, another flares up. It’s not exactly great feeling uncoordinated and weak.

Sports Injuries Happen – Here’s How To Deal With Them

“Success is not final.  Failure is not fatal.  It is the courage to continue that counts.” – Winston Churchill

Strength Training Avon

It Happens

Let’s say you compete in a sport.  This sport can range from team sports like football, soccer, or basketball to individual sports like wrestling, powerlifting, weightlifting, or fitness.  You really enjoy the camaraderie of your teammates and competitors.  You really like training your ass off to be the very best you can be at your chosen sport.  You also really like the aesthetic, strength, and conditioning improvements that are an added bonus to training for your sport.   You’re passionate about it and have very lofty goals.  It’s part of your identity.

The Comparison Trap

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A conversation goes like this:

Coach: “That was 5+, how many reps did you get on your last set?”

Client: “Well, I only got 12. Is that good?”

Coach: “That’s a lot more than 5, so yes, that’s great!”

Client: “Yeah it’s okay. But So-And-So did 15 last week. I’ll never catch them.”

Or something like this…

Client: “I just did my first ever chin up by myself!”

Coach: “That’s amazing!” *Copious high-fives*

Client: “Yeah it’s pretty good, you know, for me. Someday though, I’ll beat So-And-So…”

Comparison. It happens to everyone at one point or another in life and is prevalent in many areas – family, work, fitness, social media and more.

What Rep Range Should I Use?

I get asked all the time “What rep range should I use?”  I usually answer this with a tongue in cheek “Yes”.  I think most people get stuck in the rut of thinking they must use a certain rep range to achieve a certain goal.  bodybuilders need to do high volume and powerlifters need to do singles and triples.  That’s the ‘rules’ right?  Well those rules aren’t exactly wrong, they’re just not the best answer for long term success.

Strength Training

Before we go any further, let’s talk a little about General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS).  GAS is a term used to describe how the body handles stress.  Yes exercise is a stress, and your body is very good at adapting to it. The body will use hormones to restore itself to homeostasis in response to the stress.

Meet May’s Client of the Month – Jason!

Jason Trent

What made you initially choose Nunn’s Performance Training?

I had a friend working out there and he recommended Nunn’s. I was looking to get back in shape and decided to try it out.

What have your accomplishments been so far?

I’ve lost weight, increased my endurance and increased my strength. I also competed in my first power lifting meet in March and hit some new PR’s.

How has your success in the gym impacted your daily life?

I have way more energy to take care of the day to day tasks. I’m less winded chasing my kids around and playing.

What are your future fitness goals?

My goal for next year’s meet is to squat 400, deadlift 430, and bench 240. I also want to keep losing weight and body fat while increasing my strength and endurance.

The How and Why of Rest Days

You’ve seen us talk about rest on the blog here and there. Well, I am dedicating today’s blog post to the rest day. Why you should do it, how to do it and when.

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In today’s society, we are taught that results happen while action is occurring. We accomplish tasks as we go, on and on without rest, in the name of productivity. More is more. However, that’s not necessarily true when it comes to exercise; results happen when we rest.

Rest days are critical to performance for a variety of reasons. Rest is physically necessary so that the muscles can repair, rebuild and strengthen. Recovery also allows the body to replenish energy stores and fluids lost during exercise. Without sufficient time to repair, the body will continue to break down which can lead to symptoms of overtraining. Some signs of overtraining include disinterest, staleness, increased heart rate (even at rest), decrease in performance, depression and illness among others.

Powerlifting Meet Checklist and Tips

Powerlifting

Properly exiting the platform

 

Checklist:

 

  1. 1.      Shoes
  2. 2.      Belt
  3. 3.      Change of clothes (pads for women)
  4. 4.      Food
    1. a.      Simple sugars between attempts (Gatorade, banana, candy, etc)
    2. b.      Complex carbs, protein, and caffeine between lifts – remember, the meet may go on for several hours (Protein bar, sandwich, preworkout, etc)
    3. c.     NOW IS NOT THE TIME TO TRY NEW THINGS!

 

Tips:

 

  1. 1.      Squat
    1. a.    Start wrapping your knees when you are “In the hole”
    2. b.    Unrack the weight
    3. c.     Listen for the “Squat” command
    4. d.    Squat until your ass hits the floor and stand back up – DO NOT MISS A LIFT BECAUSE YOU WEREN’T DEEP ENOUGH! Leave no room for doubt.
    5. e.     Wait for the “Rack” command – I know it’s exciting to hit a big weight, but keep your composure until you’ve followed the judge’s commands

10 Active Outdoor Activities That You Can Do This Weekend

Canoe Trip aug14

 

August 2014 Nunn’s Canoe Trip

Spring has finally come! Wahoo!! While the weeds start to thrive and other green plants start to poke up from the ground, it’s time to remember what fresh air smells like. Leave your Netflix bingeing for another rainy day; it’s time to get outside! Here are a few ideas to get you moving and out the door.

  1. Gardening. Yeah, those weeds I mentioned above? They’re seriously starting to grow and now is the best time to get at them. Grab your gardening gloves and a trowel and play my personal favorite springtime game: “Is it a weed or a plant that I planted last year and forgot about?”
  2. Hiking. Go to a local or state park and enjoy the smell of the woods and the soft earth underfoot. Challenge yourself to tackle a big hill while you’re taking in your beautiful surroundings. Skip some stones and find a walking stick for good measure.

Thirty Three Random Thoughts, Quotes, and Ramblings

This month marks the 33rd time I’ve made the trip around the sun.  To commemorate it, I figured I’d give you 33 random thoughts, quotes, and ramblings.  Here they are:

1.  We don’t just die once; we actually die three times.

This is more of a philosophical idea than a physiological fact.  I’m not sure where I first read this, but the idea is that when you die you actually die three times.  The first time is when your heart and breathing actually stop.  You are clinically dead.  The second time is when you are seen the last time.  This is usually at the hospital or funeral home.  The third death, the most important one in my opinion, is when your name is spoken the last time.  This is a product of how much influence you had on the world.  Think about this one.  Most people’s names die out within a couple generations, but the one’s who made a big impact are spoken about for centuries.  A big goal of mine is to always leave a lasting, positive impact on the ones around me.