15 Mistakes In 10 Years

Avon fitness“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.” 
― Albert Einstein

It’s hard to believe it’s been ten years since I got my first personal training job.  Looking back on my career so far, I think I’ve accomplished quite a bit.  I’ve had clients/athletes get drafted to the NFL, sign free agent contracts to the NFL, become an olympic hopeful, make it to the big leagues, and lose thousands of pounds and get fitter and stronger that they ever thought possible.  I’ve been published to some pretty mainstream sites (like here and here).

Sure this looks pretty good, but I’ve also made plenty of mistakes and had many failures along the way.  The purpose of this post is to bring them to light so that others don’t make the same colossal failures I have.  Here’s 15 mistakes I’ve made in ten years:

Meet July’s Client of the Month – Dee Lewis!

 

deeWhat made you initially choose Nunn’s Performance Training?

I saw the sign when taking my son to soccer at Lil Kickers.

What have your accomplishments been so far?

My main accomplishments have been weight loss (about 20lbs) and my overall fitness and strength have gone up considerably.

How has your success in the gym impacted your daily life?

I’m much more active these days and overall I feel better and sleep better (and I like my sleep!!!)

What are your future fitness goals?

I’d like to increase my cardiovascular endurance and get my bench press and squat to 300+ pounds.

Great job on all your hard work Dee! We’re happy to have you here at Nunn’s Performance Training!

Guest Post: Kristin’s Perform Better Notes And Write – Up

Chicago Perform Better Summit

I recently got the opportunity to attend Perform Better’s Three Day Summit. I was a little nervous to get started but once we were there and underway, I was too busy to be nervous! To say I learned a lot is an understatement and it was a great, informative weekend. Here’s what happened!

 

brain weights.jpg

Oh The Brain Workout

 

Alwyn Cosgrove – Training the Executive Athlete

Alwyn started off my conference experience and, after reading many of his articles online, it was awesome to hear him finally speak.  The ‘executive athlete’ that he refers to is anyone who used to be an athlete or who use to be fit and wants be that again.  Those people can come to your gym already in shape and wanting to take it to the next level or it could be a fat loss client that needs a new challenge or goal.

How To Pick The Right Coach

A few weeks ago, John Meadows and Dave Tate released what they referred to as the “4 Golden Rules Of Picking A Coach”.  I wrote a post a while back called 10 Questions To Ask Your Personal Trainer and thought this scoring system would be a good addition to that.

Here are Dave and John’s 4 golden rules:

1. What is their education?
Do they have a degree? In a related field? BS, Masters, PHD? Certifications? Continuing Education? Internships? Work History? Mentors? Self Thought…? It’s very important that they understand how to translate education, studies, etc into actual client scenarios too. This is critical.

On a scale of 1-5 where do they rank? 5 would be advanced degree, internship and 2-3 very good mentors. Work back from there. If they are only self thought they get a 1 or 2.

10 Strength And Speed Training Tips For Youth Athletes

Here’s 10 tips to make sure you are getting the most out of your strength and speed training for youth athletes.

 1.  Strength Training Is Speed Training

Well known strength coach Mike Boyle is famous for saying “you can’t have speed without strength.”  Basically, he’s saying you can’t have a good speed training program without a good strength training program to accompany it.  The bottom line with speed is that you have to be able to apply force to the ground.  The more relative strength (think strength to bodyweight ratio), the faster an athlete will be.  Too many “speed” coaches and sport coaches get hung up on the speed training part and neglect the strength part.

2.  Do Planks

Basically every movement in the gym will require some sort of static stability in the torso.  I’ve talked before about how we train the core.  But, getting at least good at the plank will automatically improve both sprint technique and strength training technique.

Why Is Childhood Obesity An Issue?

 

From the CDC:

  • Approximately 17% (or  12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese.
  • Since 1980, obesity prevalence  among children and adolescents has almost tripled.

Why are children more obese now than ever?

Is it a lack of youth sports?  Doubtful.  In youth soccer, participation has went from 15 million is 1987 to 17.5 million in 2002 and still growing.  Pop Warner football participation has doubled in the last ten years.  Going from 130,000 participants to over 260,000.

Is it a lack of quality physical education in schools?  This could be one of the problems, but surely not the only one.  Due to time and budget constraints, many schools have been forced to cut back on physical education.  But, the lack of funding has been a more recent problem.  As far back as the 1950′s, the United States has shown to be inferior to other countries in terms of child fitness.

DeAnne Has Lost Over 30lbs! Check It Out!

               Working out at Nunn’s Performance Training has been one of the best investments I have made in my lifetime.   I was feeling old, overweight, and definitely out of shape.  I did not have much of a workout routine and had never really been motivated to work out.  When NPT started the “Biggest Winner” weight loss challenge in January 2012, I decided to take on the challenge.

Check Out Brian’s Testimonial!

Hey Jason, just wanted to say thanks for helping me achieve some fitness goals.  I’ve had a fairly positive and consistent workout habit since about age 40, but made the mistake of taking about an 8 month sabbatical from physical training several years ago.  I didn’t take a sabbatical from eating whatever I wanted, whenever I wanted, and as a result added over 20 lbs and it sure wasn’t muscle.  I got back into a workout routine, but discovered I would also need to change some eating habits if I wanted to get back to a healthy, fit body weight.

Should We Train Clients In Pain?

As a person who trains both athletes and general fitness clients, I’ve had more than my fair share of folks come in with some sort of nagging pain.  So, the question comes, “As strength coaches and personal trainers, do we train people in pain?”  My answer is yes…sort of.

As a fitness professional, it is not in my scope of practice to diagnose or treat pain.  I simply don’t have the tools or the skill set required to do so.  For example, if a client comes in with shoulder pain.  There are a myriad of things that could be wrong with them.  It could be an AC separation, torn labrum, torn rotator cuff, or even bone cancer.  All of which would require a different treatment.

If I have a client who comes in with any sort of persistent pain, I always have them go see their physician (In Indiana, physical therapy requires doctor referral).

Five Tips For Increasing Your Vertical Jump

Having a good vertical jump is pretty important in most sports (Captain Obvious, I know).  As such, it’s a pretty important goal for most of the athletes I work with.  Most equipment manufacturers know this and try to sell various products like jump shoes and various band contraptions to improve this.  In this post, I’m going to outline five strategies for improving vertical jump that don’t need any of these.

1.  Move Better

Movement quality is the first thing we look at when an athlete walks in the door.  Can the athlete squat without their knees falling into valgus collapse?  Do their heels lift?  Do they have poor shoulder/t-spine mobility?  If the athlete has tight hip flexors, they aren’t going to be able to access their posterior chain as well.  If the athletes knees are falling in, their heals lift, and they have poor mobility, they aren’t going to have the best jumping ability.  Vertical jump – and jumping in general – is all about force production relative to your bodyweight.  If the athlete has the poor movement skills mentioned above, they won’t be able to apply as much force to the ground.  This means a lower vertical jump.